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July 2014
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July 2014
31

Anonymous asked

hi I'm writing a story with a canonically non-gendered character and overwhelmed by the amount of information there is on sexuality and gender. do you have any references where i could start??

Hey Anon!

totally understand about being overwhelmed by the sheer amount of things there are on sexuality and gender. (Especially on tumblr, where not only respect and representation have become important, but where correct representation has become important.) While admittedly I’m still personally learning about the LGBTQIAPplus community as a whole (and can definitely be mistaken about things), I hope that I’ve found some useful references that can get you started? (As opposed to giving you irrelevant or useless references, haha.)

Once again, I hope this helps! (And if I’ve misinterpreted your question somehow or haven’t given you what you wanted, feel free to shoot me another ask and tell me.) Good luck!!

- Alastair

July 2014
31
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WHEN SOMEONE LOVES A BOOK I RECOMMENDED

dukeofbookingham:

I’m like:

image

#r.h.   #hehe   
July 2014
31
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faithfire asked

Do you have any suggestions for how to outline a novel? I feel like if I try to write it without outlining it first, I lose my motivation and everything sounds like crap.

characterandwritinghelp:

Anonymous said to characterandwritinghelp: I’m trying to start writing a book and I have a vague idea of the plot but I can’t figure out how to arrange my thoughts in the right order so that the story flows better. Could you help me out?

Anonymous said to characterandwritinghelp: I’m personally very bad at organizing myself and my thoughts on paper. I usually lose my notes or forget they exist, and I was wondering if you had any resources online that I could use to keep track of my notes, short stories, etc. Thanks!

I AM ALL ABOUT OUTLINES, MY FRIENDS. Things to remember when you outline:

  • It does not have to make sense. Your outline is for you and no one else. My outlines usually contain a mess of words thrown down in a rough approximation of sentences. The important thing is that you understand it.
  • Use every tool at your disposal. Get highlighters and sticky notes to help you track story arcs. Use a procrastination sheet and a bookmark word to keep track of things that need extra work. Sketch things out on a timeline or a mind map. Nothing is stupid if it helps you get your story written.
  • Do not be afraid to change things. The beauty of outlining is that you can take a look at your story as a whole. If you outline it all and take a step back to see something that looks like it no longer works, change it (but do not get rid of it, paste it on a clipboard somewhere and squirrel it away for later).

Sites and tools:

Useful tags:

-Headless

July 2014
31
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A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: 1. What am I trying to say? 2. What words will express it? 3. What image or idiom will make it clearer? 4. Is this image fresh enough to have an effect?

 - George Orwell; Politics and the English Language (via wordpainting)
#mm   #quote   #writing advice   
July 2014
31
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pastar0ni:

IS THIS SOME KIND OF SICK JOKE

pastar0ni:

IS THIS SOME KIND OF SICK JOKE

#hahahaha   #john green   #f.h.   #tfios   
July 2014
31
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The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.

 -

Brent Weeks (via victoriousvocabulary)

BAM

(via yeahwriters)

July 2014
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knitbro:

forgotn1:

constructofconcience:

I actually sort of needed this

This is easy to forget. Everyone starts somewhere unless they’re a prodigy that started at 3, and even they started somewhere (they were just too young to remember it).

i could totally make a sweater like the one he’s wearing, but only because 15 years ago i started out knitting wonky crooked lumpy scarves that confused me by curling into tubes because i didn’t know stockinette stitch curls and i thought i did something wrong and angrycried over it.

sucking at something is the first step to being good at it.

July 2014
31
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A Few Quick Resources on Explosions

writeworld:

Thank you! We actually do have a few ideas on how to get some solid information on explosives!

If you have Netflix, try looking into the Mythbusters collection on explosives. They talk a lot about shrapnel and shock waves and other aspects of an explosion that many writers (especially those in Hollywood) often omit. Here are a few good myths to check out:

If you wanted to talk to an expert (which I highly recommend), look for people online or in your community who have the sorts of jobs listed below and set up an interview with them (over the phone, through email, or in person) to get your burning questions answered. If the people who do these jobs can’t get you the answers you need, they’ll definitely know where you should look.

  • EOD Technician
  • PSBT Technicians
  • UXO Technicians
  • Firefighters
  • Fireworks Technicians 
  • Munitions Experts 
The Big Bang. A History of Explosives by G.I. Brown is also a great resource for information about the effects and history of explosives. 

And here are a few online resources for learning more about explosives:

Thank you for your question! If you have any comments on this post or other questions about writing, you can message us here

-C

July 2014
31
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vqsv:

*reads mediocre prose and narrows eyes while mentally improving diction and syntax*

*reads good prose and gets excited*
#ugh   #my life tbh   #w.h.   #r.h.